Tag: new

Exploring Texas

The Rolling Hills of Clifton, Texas

Today we made the day trip into Clifton, Texas to drop off some artwork for the Bosque Museum show. Exploring the back roads in and out of Clifton it is no wonder that Clifton is becoming a popular tourist destination. Clifton is that rare small town gem which seems to offer a little bit of everything for those wishing to leave the stress of city life for a relaxing, fun-filled time in a nostalgic country setting.

As for entertainment, Clifton has been called one of the “100 best small art towns in America,” and is known throughout the south for is its diverse art colony. Clifton is home to the Bosque Art Center, one of the finest community art complexes in the state. The Art Center boasts an impressive permanent collection of art, a live theater, photography exhibits, a multitude of classes, and special offerings.

For the outdoorsman and hunter in the family, Bosque County offers a multitude of wildlife and game ranches teaming with deer, birds, and exotics. The camper and fisherman need look no further than nearby Meridian Lake, Lake Whitney, or the Bosque and Brazos Rivers.

Clifton is only 30 minutes away from Waco and midway between Dallas/Fort Worth and Austin at the top of the beautiful Texas Hill Country… Just perfect for a day trip!

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Seasoned Hand

Seasoned Hand

Cowboys – steady, quietly confident and honest.

I love these qualities in a Cowboy. When I started this drawing, those qualities came to mind. Whether this Cowboy is silently waiting to move the herd, or counting down the last cow before suppertime, I think the “Seasoned Hand” epitomizes the Cowboy Way of Life.

This drawing is 12 x 16, drawn with Graphite Pencil on Bristol Board Paper. This particular drawing took on average, about 65 hours to complete.

To view this drawing – and all my drawings – check out my website: Geri Dunn, Western Graphite Artwork

Graphite Art in Texas

Brotherly Love

After spending quite a bit of time in the studio and out at Art Festivals throughout Arizona, Texas and Oklahoma, I am ready to get back into my studio and create more artwork!
For the second half of the year, I am super excited about 3 pieces of artwork that have been accepted into “America’s Horse in Art” Show & Sale at the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in Amarillo, Texas.
Opening Reception Night is August 16, 2014 and promises to be a blast.
Along with the top drawing, here are the other two pieces of artwork accepted to this wonderful event.

Pretty Boy

Some Call Him Naughty

Red-Tailed Hawk Graphite Drawing

Red Tailed Hawk - Graphite Drawing
Red Tailed Hawk – Graphite Drawing

In numerous traditions, the hawk has a strong relationship with the world of the gods. Some of this symbolism has persisted in modern mythology and beliefs.

At the same time, hawks can soar and fly high in the sky. This animal has the power to provide support in gaining a higher level perspective on any issue or project you undertake. When the hawk appears in your life, it’s perhaps time to be less distracted by the details and focus on the higher perspective. Relying on the hawk power, you can see what’s ahead clearly and defy any obstacles that may be on your way.

Growing up in a small ranching area, it was quite common to see the Red Tailed Hawk. So much so, that I never thought much about seeing them soar, hunt in the tall wheat grasses, and perched on a telephone pole along the side of the road.

When my husband and I moved to Texas, they were few and far between. Not only is this when I realized how much I had taken their presence for granted – I realized how much beauty they possess. I was thinking of this one day, while working in Downtown Dallas, in one of the taller buildings. I had a window office, overlooking all of Downtown, including Dallas Fair Park and Big Tex. To my astonishment, a Red Tailed Hawk came soaring in between the tall buildings, equivalent to the 25th Floor, and perched on the window sill of my office. For several weeks, he repeated this – and then one day he was gone…

So when I look upon a Hawk today, I do feel like the Red Tailed Hawk is a symbol of good fortune and good health. And that is what inspired several versions of this drawing. 

This drawing was created with graphite pencils, and pastel (for the eye). Finished size is 8 x 10.

Tools of the Trade

A Cowboy has his Lasso.

A Musician has his Guitar.

I have my Pencil.

The humble graphite pencil might seem like the simplest of drawing tools, and so it is – but with time and much practice, this creative tool can become a wonder to behold.  The next few posts will unveil the Tools of My Trade. Today – the Wood-Cased Pencils.

Usually cased in Cedar, these pencils possess a lightness much different than drafting pencils. Graphite Pencils have cores made from powdered graphite (not lead) fired with clay, varying in hardness. The type of graphite used in pencils is relatively soft and malleable, a little like lead, and was mistakenly thought to be a form of lead when first discovered. The misnomer stuck, and many people think that pencils once had lead cores, though they never did. Graphite leaves a small, smooth particle on the paper that has a slight sheen.

Pencils can vary widely in quality. Irregularities in substandard or poorly processed graphite can lead to unpredictable tonal range, and even worse, scratches in the paper. Uncentered cores tend to break on sharpening. High quality artist’s pencils deliver reliable, even tone at carefully graded hardnesses, and are less prone to breakage.

The familiar ‘graylead’ pencil has a graphite/clay core encased in cedar wood. These range in hardness from around 9b (very soft) up to 9H (very hard indeed) depending on the brand. Most artists starting out will find that a selection of 2H, HB, 2B, 4B and 6B is more than adequate to start with.

While some may argue of the inherent disadvantages of these pencils – such as a shortening when continued sharpening, as well as having a tendency to break internally, I prefer wood-cased pencils, because they are consistent, and can be utilized with a sharp point or a smooth edge, useful in shading.

 Turquoise Drafting Pencil

Hard Leads –

Prismacolor Turquoise Drawing Pencils are my preferred pencils for the hard leads. They are well fired and consistent, and have much

less wax in the makeup of their pencil than other brands. Harder pencils excel for their ability to hold sharp points, and are used for straight line and detail work. They come in the ranges of 9H – 2H.

 

Graphite Pencils
Graphite Pencils

 

Soft Leads

Staedtler Pencils used to be my favorite soft lead pencils (they come in dark blue). While I still use these pencils on occasion, I have recently discovered General’s “Kimberly” Pencils, (the green pencil) and now I am sold on these. These pencils are made of a non-porous Ceylon graphite cores, making them much more dense and durable.

The core is “Carbo-Welded” to withstand four times the normal point pressure, which lends themselves to strength throughout the life of the pencil.

Graphite Pencils
Graphite Pencils

Soft leads consist of 2B-9B.  Soft leads are best suited to sketching and blending, and delivering the darkest of tones.

Some Call Him Naughty…

HorseThe best time of year to sit back and have some fun is when the baby horses are out in the pastures.  You could burn hours having a blast just watching the colts and fillies playing with each other, the mamas and anything that moves in the tall grasses.

This is what inspired me to do this drawing. Some called him naughty, ‘cuz he wouldn’t leave everyone alone, but I think he is rather cute!

Dreaming of the Grand Tetons

Grand Tetons Panorama

Yesterday I woke up in the middle of the night, clearly thinking that I was hiking.

Not just hiking anywhere, but hiking and camping in the Grand Tetons.

Amazing to think, especially when my husband is recovering from a motorcycle accident this past June, so walking without the aids of canes/crutches would be amazing enough, but to be hiking…

I think what did it was browsing the website of a wonderful photographer and friend, Charles St. Charles and his sweet wife, Jennifer. Charles’ photography is incredible! We met last April at an Art Festival in Fort Worth, Texas. The things he can do with a camera are so breathtaking. I truly enjoy the photos incorporating the dew drops as multiple mini-cameras.

DSCF7230LoRes

To see more, I’ve attached the link to view his website.