Tag: horses

Exploring Texas

The Rolling Hills of Clifton, Texas

Today we made the day trip into Clifton, Texas to drop off some artwork for the Bosque Museum show. Exploring the back roads in and out of Clifton it is no wonder that Clifton is becoming a popular tourist destination. Clifton is that rare small town gem which seems to offer a little bit of everything for those wishing to leave the stress of city life for a relaxing, fun-filled time in a nostalgic country setting.

As for entertainment, Clifton has been called one of the “100 best small art towns in America,” and is known throughout the south for is its diverse art colony. Clifton is home to the Bosque Art Center, one of the finest community art complexes in the state. The Art Center boasts an impressive permanent collection of art, a live theater, photography exhibits, a multitude of classes, and special offerings.

For the outdoorsman and hunter in the family, Bosque County offers a multitude of wildlife and game ranches teaming with deer, birds, and exotics. The camper and fisherman need look no further than nearby Meridian Lake, Lake Whitney, or the Bosque and Brazos Rivers.

Clifton is only 30 minutes away from Waco and midway between Dallas/Fort Worth and Austin at the top of the beautiful Texas Hill Country… Just perfect for a day trip!

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America’ Horse in Art

Some Call Him Naughty

Wow! As August 16th quickly approaches, and I see the roster of all of the talented artists participating in the American Quarter Horse Museum’s Annual Art Show, I am truly humbled and excited to be a part of something so unique.

I have three pieces submitted, including the drawing above, titled “Some Call Him Naughty”. The opening reception is just a couple of weeks away, beginning on August 16th and should be a ton of fun!

For more information, including all three of my drawings submitted for this show, click on the picture below.

ahia_logo

Ruidoso, New Mexico

Picture1

Being an Artist has a lot of advantages over other jobs.

At times, it’s an indoor job. Other times, it’s an outdoor job. Sometimes you put in hours enjoyably in your studio, while other times you log several hours a day promoting your artwork. While the miles logged in getting to an Art Festival can be brutal, along with setting up my portable gallery, there certainly are perks associated with showing at these Art Festivals.

This past weekend, I participated in the Ruidoso, New Mexico Art Festival. It was an honor to be in the company of such fine artists. But the perks for me was going to one of my all-time favorite destinations.

Having stumbled upon this wonderfully charming town 1-1/2 years ago, it has tons of charm, as well as fantastic restaurants and shops. Plenty of fishing, 4×4 Jeep Trails, and skiing in the winter. If you want to indulge in horse racing – they have that too!

Next time you want to plan a get away – think of Ruidoso, New Mexico as your next destination. And if you plan it on the last weekend in July, you can take in the art show as well.

Enjoy!

 

Seasoned Hand

Seasoned Hand

Cowboys – steady, quietly confident and honest.

I love these qualities in a Cowboy. When I started this drawing, those qualities came to mind. Whether this Cowboy is silently waiting to move the herd, or counting down the last cow before suppertime, I think the “Seasoned Hand” epitomizes the Cowboy Way of Life.

This drawing is 12 x 16, drawn with Graphite Pencil on Bristol Board Paper. This particular drawing took on average, about 65 hours to complete.

To view this drawing – and all my drawings – check out my website: Geri Dunn, Western Graphite Artwork

Graphite Art in Texas

Brotherly Love

After spending quite a bit of time in the studio and out at Art Festivals throughout Arizona, Texas and Oklahoma, I am ready to get back into my studio and create more artwork!
For the second half of the year, I am super excited about 3 pieces of artwork that have been accepted into “America’s Horse in Art” Show & Sale at the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum in Amarillo, Texas.
Opening Reception Night is August 16, 2014 and promises to be a blast.
Along with the top drawing, here are the other two pieces of artwork accepted to this wonderful event.

Pretty Boy

Some Call Him Naughty

Mustangs in Texas

Wild_Mustang_by_kvickreyWhile doing research on wild mustangs, I wondered if there are still wild mustangs alive and present in Texas. All of my previous research had confirmed that the wild mustangs originated from bloodstock imported from the Iberian Peninsula. Horses brought by the Spanish included the Ginete, Arabian, Villano, Berber, and Barb bloodlines.

Very few wild herds today possess original Spanish blood. The first American Indian horses were bred from stock acquired from the herds of the Spanish missions beginning in the early 1600s. The missions were the source of cattle as well as foundation herds of Spanish mustangs.

The Spanish mustang stands from thirteen to fifteen hands tall and weighs 750 to 1,000 pounds. There are three different types: one lighter-bodied and slightly leggy like its Barb ancestors, one heavier and more blocky like the Spanish Ginete, and one that resembles a small Andalusian. The eyes are large and bright, and some mustangs have heavy bone protruding over the eyes. The head profile may be straight, dish-faced, or convex. The chest is medium to somewhat narrow, with the ribs well-sprung; the back is short and stout. The hooves are small, often narrow with a pointed toe, and of a harder texture than hooves of most domestic horses.

The first Spanish horses on record were brought to Texas in 1542 by the Moscoso Expedition, which originated with a landing in what is today Tampa Bay. At the turn of the century, they were seen in vast numbers. When you see these beautiful animals, the spectator is compelled to stand in amazement, and contemplate this noble animal, as he bounds over the earth, with the conscious pride of freedom. They were so plentiful, that at times hundreds were seen in the neighborhood of Houston, darting over the plains, and seeming to dare the sportsman for a contest in the chase.  Artist Frederic Remington remarked, “Of all the monuments which the Spaniard has left to glorify his reign in America, there will be none more worthy than his horse.”

The many remarkable qualities of the Spanish mustang, particularly its endurance, made it the horse of choice for most frontiersmen and cowboys. Many ranchers and horse breeders chose to use the Spanish mustang to weave these characteristics into their herds, unfortunately dilluting the best characteristics of the breed. Fewer than 3,000 purebred Spanish mustangs are left today. At the close of the twentieth century some of the strongest efforts to restore the Spanish mustang were centered in Texas, including the American Indian Horse Registry, headquartered in Lockhart, and the efforts of private ranches such as Karma Farms near Marshall, Blazing Saddles Ranch in Winona, and Las Remudas in Odessa.